Yacht runs aground on Outer Banks beach, national park says

title=wpil_keyword_linkNational Park Service.” title=”A 55-foot yacht named Vivens Aqua ran aground at Cape Hatteras National Seashore on Jan. 25, according to the National Park Service.” loading=”lazy”/>

A 55-foot yacht named Vivens Aqua ran aground at Cape Hatteras National Seashore on Jan. 25, according to the National Park Service.

National Park Service photo

One of the popular beaches along Cape Hatteras National Seashore now sports a 55-foot yacht as a tourist attraction.

Named Vivens Aqua, the yacht ran aground overnight near the southern end of Ocracoke Island in North Carolina, according to the National Park Service.

It’s the latest in a string of ships to become mired in the park‘s quicksand in recent months. However, most tend to be stoned fishing trawlers.

“The grounding happened around 1 a.m. (January 25), according to the yacht owner,” the park said.

“The National Park Service is consulting with the US Coast Guard and working with the owner to have the vessel removed from the beach.”

Investigators have not specified the cause of the accident, but experts say engine problems are usually blamed on boats that stray too close to shore.

It is the third vessel to run aground in the park since November, including the fishing boat Jonathan Ryan and a 37ft sailboat named the Alhambra, officials said. Both have been removed.

The Ocean Pursuit, which became a tourist attraction after getting stranded in 2020 and staying there for over a year, is one of the best-known ships to run aground in the park.

He was abducted in November after settling in the sand to his deck. The ship became so popular that the park had to put up signs telling visitors to stay out of its flooded cabins.

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Mark Price has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer since 1991, covering topics including schools, crime, immigration, LGBTQ issues, homelessness and nonprofits. He graduated from the University of Memphis with a major in journalism and art history, and a minor in geology.

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