Local activities – Caribbean Cowboy RV Resort http://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:56:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-89.png Local activities – Caribbean Cowboy RV Resort http://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/ 32 32 Philadelphia Tasting Tours, Rooftop Fireside Drinks, and Holiday Wreath Workshop https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/philadelphia-tasting-tours-rooftop-fireside-drinks-and-holiday-wreath-workshop/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:37:08 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/philadelphia-tasting-tours-rooftop-fireside-drinks-and-holiday-wreath-workshop/ Along with the stuffed turkey, prepared sides and baked pies, I show my visiting family the city with classic dishes, hot drinks and festive activities. This week, I’m on the Flavors of Philly tour to try classic Philly dishes, sipping boozy (and non-alcoholic) winter drinks by the fire on the way back from Alpine Heights […]]]>

Along with the stuffed turkey, prepared sides and baked pies, I show my visiting family the city with classic dishes, hot drinks and festive activities. This week, I’m on the Flavors of Philly tour to try classic Philly dishes, sipping boozy (and non-alcoholic) winter drinks by the fire on the way back from Alpine Heights Assembly and attending a holiday wreath-making workshop with a local artist at a neighborhood coffee shop.

Show your out-of-town guests how to eat like a Philadelphian. Enjoy tomato pie at Joe’s Pizza, cheese fries and pretzels at Philly Pretzel Factory, cheesesteaks at Zio’s Brick Oven Pizza and more with the flavors of Philly. The 2.5-hour tour begins at Chestnut Street and continues for six blocks (or an 11-minute walk) with stops at five restaurants for these cheesesteaks, fries, pies, soft pretzels and two Reading Terminal Market treats ( think cookies and donuts). Enjoy beautiful architecture with up-close visits to historic sites like City Hall along the way, plus food and landmark stops.

The tour runs from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, from noon to 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays and from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Sundays. Adults pay $49 and children (ages 5-10) pay $44. Get tickets for November 23, 25 and 27 online—hurry, they’re selling out.

📍 1601 Chestnut St., 📞 844-436-6336, 🌐 phillysfoodtour.com

Curl up with plush blankets and sip hot chocolate infused with dark rum, tangy lemon cordial, sweet chocolate ganache and orgeat for a boozy, rich drink ($15) by the fireplace and picturesque views from Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Assembly Rooftop. But if you’re not a chocolate lover, then the Honey & Smoke (a smoky, ginger, honey and lemon mezcal) for $17 or the “Be Well” wassil wine (a honey, spicy cabernet blended with port and brandy) for $15 are the ones for you. And non-drinkers, ask for a non-alcoholic hot chocolate, it’s just as good.

Be sure to enjoy bites concocted by Executive Chef Sonny Ingui. It has a bubbling four cheese fondue dipping in crispy garlic bread and more. Make your reservation online.

📍1840 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy, 📞 215-783-4171, 🌐 assemblyrooftop.com

Each year, Rally Coffee hangs decorated wreaths at the store to ring in the holidays, and many ask where they came from. This Sunday, the South 7th Street boutique invites artist Zachary Martin to teach you how to create your own intricate and festive flower crown. All materials will be provided — there will be vines, greenery and forage materials. Martin has been creating wreaths for years inspired by the flora and fauna of Wissahickon, and will walk you through the process. Come to the boutique on November 27 at 4:30 p.m. and work on your crown until 6:30 p.m. for $100. There will be wine and light snacks offered. RSVP online.

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Celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day in Alaska https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/celebrating-indigenous-peoples-day-in-alaska/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:56:18 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/celebrating-indigenous-peoples-day-in-alaska/ Indigenous Peoples Day is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Alaska. Alaska was the second state after North Dakota to recognize it as a holiday. It has a relatively short history as a celebration, having only been recognized since 2015. In 2017, Governor Walker said that “Alaska is built on the homelands and […]]]>

Indigenous Peoples Day is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Alaska. Alaska was the second state after North Dakota to recognize it as a holiday. It has a relatively short history as a celebration, having only been recognized since 2015. In 2017, Governor Walker said that “Alaska is built on the homelands and communities of the indigenous peoples of this region, without that state building would not be possible.Indigenous Peoples Day is a celebration honoring the original peoples of Alaska.Long before recorded history, people lived and thrived on this land, and this special day honors their contribution to our great state.

In addition to Alaska’s vast and varied landscape, the state has an equally vibrant cultural landscape. The growing list of Indigenous Peoples Day celebrations honors and celebrates Alaska’s Native culture. Many of the day’s events are aimed at local audiences, but visitors are always welcome and the number of Indigenous Peoples Day events in the state is growing each year.

  • The University of Alaska is a major partner with many local Indigenous groups in celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day and its website is often one of the best resources for finding such events.
  • Deep in Interior Alaska, the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) holds celebrations on the lands of the Lower Tanana people. In 2022, UAF hosted a local screening of “Awake,” a short film about the past, present, and future of Alaska Native language revitalization, along with guest speakers, small workshops, and a fundraiser for fried bread tacos. UAF updates its website annually with information about Indigenous Peoples Day events in Fairbanks and other UAF family campuses.
  • Southeast Alaska is a popular tourist destination and home to the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian peoples. In the Southeast, the University of Alaska has campuses in Juneau, Sitka, and Ketchikan, and these campuses host events centered around this holiday. The Southeast celebration includes signs, film screenings and activities such as Indigenous Youth Olympics demonstrations, ornament making and paddle painting.
  • The UA Kuskokwim campus is in the central city of Bethel in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta region. It is the homeland of the Yup’ik, Cup’ik and Athabascan peoples. The local campus, in partnership with local Indigenous groups in Bethel, hosts a potluck, presentations and craft workshops before an Indigenous Peoples Day march that ends with a traditional dance celebration.
  • Nome is the home of the Inupiaq people and the home of the thousand mile Iditarod sled dog race. UA’s North West Campus is partnering with local organizations to host a film festival featuring fresh baked goods. And, in 2022, the nearby Native Village of Solomon, Alaska hosted an Indigenous Peoples Day celebration at the Nome Community Center featuring local speakers, a potluck and fashion show, as well as performances by song and dance by local individuals and groups. Events are primarily advertised on Facebook, but all are open to the public.
  • In Anchorage, home of the Dena’ina Athabascan peoples, Alaska Pacific University (APU) is hosting a celebration in partnership with UA, local nonprofits, and tribal organizations on the APU campus. This celebration includes dance performances, a potluck, and local speakers honoring the significance of this celebratory day.

Alaska Native Peoples Day officially recognizes and celebrates the contributions of Alaska Natives to the history of this state. If you find yourself in Alaska during the month of October, be sure to come celebrate with us!

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Shop Small: Where to Shop Locally in Charlottesville, VA https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/shop-small-where-to-shop-locally-in-charlottesville-va/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 11:00:39 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/shop-small-where-to-shop-locally-in-charlottesville-va/ Charlottesville, Virginia is best known for its University of Virginia campus and for being home to two former presidents of the United States. Over the years, the city has evolved, offering a vibrant food scene, as well as a large number of diverse local businesses. There’s even a thriving arts community just outside of town. […]]]>

Charlottesville, Virginia is best known for its University of Virginia campus and for being home to two former presidents of the United States. Over the years, the city has evolved, offering a vibrant food scene, as well as a large number of diverse local businesses. There’s even a thriving arts community just outside of town.

Shopping in Charlottesville, and shopping locally in general, helps build a welcoming, welcoming and fun community. Consumer support also helps keep a large number of Charlottesville residents employed and encourages other businesses to locate in town. The push to buy locally has been strong for this reason. Today we’re going to take a look at some of the thriving small businesses Charlottesville has to offer.

The downtown shopping center

Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall is a city staple, offering over 120 shops and over 30 restaurants. The mall spans the length of Main Street and includes restored historic buildings and a few modern buildings as well. In the middle of the mall is a beautifully paved brick walkway that makes the space easily navigable. Parking is easy to manage, with multiple lots and garages surrounding the mall. UVA students and their families can also take advantage of a free trolley service that takes you downtown.

Dozens of restaurants along the Downtown Mall offer everything from gourmet sandwiches to burger bars, bars and more. The Fitzroy is a classic bar where you can enjoy classic cocktails and upscale bar fare in a stunning interior. Another popular spot, The Southern offers rock fans a place to catch local and national acts most nights of the week. It has a basement rock-club vibe with a cafe-style menu.

Foodies who prefer a more diverse menu flock to options like Himalayan Fusion, which offers Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan cuisine. There’s also Cinema Taco, a movie-themed Mexican restaurant, Ten, a Japanese restaurant famous for its sake thefts, or Fleur, a French fine-dining option.

Between the delicious dining options, there are over a hundred shops to visit in the Downtown Mall. Shoppers who want more unique, one-of-a-kind items should head over to Low Vintage. Low Vintage is a curated thrift store with vintage clothing, records, and other eclectic items. Book lovers won’t want to miss 2nd Act Books, a massive second-hand bookstore run by a retired UVA professor, with a community space and occasional author readings. The majestic looking Oyster House Antiques is the perfect stop for anyone looking for traditional antique Chinese furniture, all selected and restored by the owner.

West Main Street

You could eat all your meals in one day along West Main Street. Historically part of the Three Notch’d Road, vital for traveling through Virginia in the 1800s, this street runs between UVA and the Downtown Mall, a prime location that led to its rapid revitalization. West Main Street now has a wide variety of restaurants and shops.

Today, you can find restaurants like the Blue Moon Diner. Once The Waffle Shop in the 1950s, this classic American restaurant is now a casual spot where you can enjoy your morning breakfast. Maya is a restaurant and bar that offers upgraded versions of southern dishes like shrimp and grits, fried oysters, and key lime pie. There’s also Tavern & Grocery, a local farm-to-table restaurant with a speakeasy in the basement.

Although you will find a number of hotels on this strip, largely due to the proximity to UVA, the restaurants dominate as you proceed down the street. The famous Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar will be any Italian food lover’s dream. Just on the outskirts of the city center, the menu consists of Italian, Spanish, Greek and French dishes. Next door is a Mexican restaurant called Little Star. Using local ingredients cooked over an open fire, the chef creates beautiful, photo-worthy plates.

Crozet Artisan Depot

Artists and artisans will thrive at the Crozet Artisan Depot. Less than 30 minutes from downtown Charlottesville, “The Depot” is a gallery and studio that hosts openings, workshops and art demonstrations. It is housed in a historic railway depot, with works by more than 80 artists covering its walls. Local artists of all ages are featured in monthly exhibitions. You can take a look at the 2022 artists here.

For gift shoppers, the Depot offers a variety of art, including painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and stained glass. Handmade products sold in the Crozet Artisan Depot store change from season to season and may include clocks, hats, scarves, wood carvings and other handcrafted treasures. The Depot also sells locally made honey and jelly and has a Gearharts Fine Chocolates where you can buy handmade chocolates.

The Crozet Artisan Depot’s goal is to blend art and community, giving artists a living simply doing what they do best – and local residents a way to support them while buying unique gifts. and unique.

Do you want more ?

We have only approached a small number of businesses in Charlottesville. However, this small sample should give you a taste of the wide range of businesses located in the city. If you need comprehensive guides to the city and its local attractions, we have some suggested local directories below:

  • Shop local Charlottesville brands: BuyCville allows you to search and shop locally online for products available from Charlottesville businesses. A search experience similar to Amazon, the site makes it easy to find local products.
  • Cville Black Biz Directory: Want to support black-owned businesses in Charlottesville? The Cville Black Biz Directory will connect you with local Black-owned businesses.
  • Visit Charlottesville: The city’s tourist page allows visitors to search for everything from museums to restaurants, bars, hotels and outdoor activities. It also publishes a list of upcoming events.
  • Guide to Charlottesville: Charlottesville.guide allows you to search by activity (restaurants, hotels, catering, etc.). You can find popular locations with short descriptions, as well as parking notes and hours of operation.
  • daily progress: Charlottesville’s newspaper, The Daily Progress has a local store section that allows you to search through businesses and find contact information and location. There are virtually every business in town listed here.

Source: Google Maps

The bottom line

When you shop locally and support businesses like the ones in Charlottesville, you’re helping support the nation’s workforce. Small businesses make up over 99% of all businesses in the United States, and without them it would be difficult to grow and sustain communities. Plus, we wouldn’t have any of the unique local creations that often come from these companies. Swiping your card at local businesses on Small Business Saturday is an important step in helping those businesses thrive, but don’t forget to continue this support throughout the year as well.

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Activities for families and fitness enthusiasts at Umm Al Emarat Park this winter https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/activities-for-families-and-fitness-enthusiasts-at-umm-al-emarat-park-this-winter/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 07:58:40 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/activities-for-families-and-fitness-enthusiasts-at-umm-al-emarat-park-this-winter/ Being outdoors has many benefits for our physical and mental health, for both adults and children. One of the capital’s most beloved green spaces, Umm Al Emarat Park – which turns 40 this year – celebrates the winter months with a host of activities, from family events to sessions focused on fitness. The Park Market, […]]]>

Being outdoors has many benefits for our physical and mental health, for both adults and children. One of the capital’s most beloved green spaces, Umm Al Emarat Park – which turns 40 this year – celebrates the winter months with a host of activities, from family events to sessions focused on fitness.

The Park Market, launched last Friday, continues until March 18, from 4-11 p.m., and promises a fun night out for all age groups.

Those with kids can head to the ever-popular Petting Zoo, where little ones can interact with rabbits, ponies, pygmy goats, llamas, emus, and camels. Pets can only be fed park-approved food, so it’s also a good opportunity to learn how to develop little ones’ empathy for our animal friends.

Elsewhere, kids can enjoy the outdoor cinema on a grassy expanse, complete with popcorn. Cinema in the Park will screen kid-friendly films every Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

Other activities include bubble and mud stations, kite flying, arts and crafts counters, storytelling sessions, magic and clown shows, live performances, and traveling entertainers.

Fitness enthusiasts can make the most of the park’s hiking trails and jogging tracks, while those looking to deepen their meditation skills can sign up for sessions hosted by Inner Space. These free classes will take place at the Jardin du Soir at 6:30 p.m. every Thursday until December 29 (except December 1).

Sessions are held alternately in Arabic and English, with the next, on Thursday, being held in Arabic. Slots are limited to 15 people and pre-booking is required.

Those who just feel like wandering around can browse the wares offered by local retailers.

Aldhara Fresh Market at Umm Al Emarat Park.  Victor Besa / The National

Sustainability is the order of the day at Umm Al Emarat Park, which favors handmade products from local vendors. Flea-market-style prop stalls sell resin art candles, abayas, crocheted items, silverware, custom hats and bags, skincare products, perfumes and fake but fashionable antiques. The park will also host a rotating gallery of artists.

Rasha Kablawi, Head of Corporate Affairs and Communications at Umm Al Emarat Park, said, “We look forward to embracing the community around us to create a collaborative atmosphere to support local SMEs, empower women and bonding people…with lots of fun for the whole family.

Pre-book Inner Space sessions via WhatsApp on 050 795 2519. For more information visit www.ummalemaratpark.ae

Updated: November 12, 2022, 7:55 a.m.

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Nebraska School Activities Association Announces NFHS NSAA State Coaches of the Year https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/nebraska-school-activities-association-announces-nfhs-nsaa-state-coaches-of-the-year/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 02:48:00 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/nebraska-school-activities-association-announces-nfhs-nsaa-state-coaches-of-the-year/ LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN) – The National Federation of State High School Associations and the Nebraska School Activities Association have announced the 2021-2022 NFHS NSAA Coaches of the Year. These coaches will be honored at halftime of the Class A women’s basketball semifinal game on Friday, March 3, 2023 at Pinnacle Bank Arena in Lincoln. 2021-2022 […]]]>

LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN) – The National Federation of State High School Associations and the Nebraska School Activities Association have announced the 2021-2022 NFHS NSAA Coaches of the Year. These coaches will be honored at halftime of the Class A women’s basketball semifinal game on Friday, March 3, 2023 at Pinnacle Bank Arena in Lincoln.

2021-2022 NFHS NSAA State Coaches of the Year:

  • Evan Bohnet, South Sioux City – Girls wrestling
  • Kelly Cooksley, broken bow – Golf for girls
  • Brian Fleischman, Overton – Golf for boys
  • Steve Frey, Millard West – Baseball
  • Joe Hesse, Humphrey/Lindsay Holy Family – Boys Basketball
  • Jon Holtz, Elkhorn – Boys Tennis
  • Chace Hutchinson, Gretna – Women’s football
  • Sam Jilka, Lexington – Cross-country boys
  • Josh JohnsonWayne – Girls bowling
  • Lance Kush, North Elkhorn – Girls Tennis
  • Paul Lee, Big Island – Bowling for boys
  • Joel Lemus-Leon, Lexington – Boys Soccer
  • Matt McKay, Sidney – Boys athletics
  • Ryan Mraz, Sutherland – Boys Wrestling
  • Ross Mueller, Lincoln Southwest – Swimming & Diving
  • Melinda Nielsen, Ogallala – Unified Sports, Bowling
  • Kevin Schrad, Lincoln Southwest – Girls athletics
  • Mike Spiers, Howells-Dodge – Soccer
  • David Stallings, South Millard – Unified sports, athletics
  • Aaron Steup, North Bend Central – Girls Basketball
  • Mark Watt, Lincoln Southwest – Soft ball
  • Donna Wiedeburg, Sydney – Girls cross-country skiing
  • Sue Ziegler, Lincoln Lutheran – Volleyball
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New additions to DLHS raise the sails on Laker Pride – Detroit Lakes Tribune https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/new-additions-to-dlhs-raise-the-sails-on-laker-pride-detroit-lakes-tribune/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/new-additions-to-dlhs-raise-the-sails-on-laker-pride-detroit-lakes-tribune/ DETROIT LAKES — Rob Nielsen looked at the acoustic panels installed at the Lakeshirt Fieldhouse at Detroit Lakes High School and got goosebumps. The school district’s activities director noted, “It’s been interesting how many times I’ve had goosebumps since my wife and I moved into the community. Sound panels feature Laker athletes from all sports. […]]]>

DETROIT LAKES — Rob Nielsen looked at the acoustic panels installed at the Lakeshirt Fieldhouse at Detroit Lakes High School and got goosebumps.

The school district’s activities director noted, “It’s been interesting how many times I’ve had goosebumps since my wife and I moved into the community.

Sound panels feature Laker athletes from all sports. Athletic moments captured on film were mixed with digital prints by an artist at Trophy House in Detroit Lakes. When the images were mixed, they were printed on acoustic panels provided by DOW Acoustics, also of Detroit Lakes.

Nielsen said a five-person committee reviewed thousands of images to be featured on the 6-by-4-foot panels. Most sports received three panels. A total of 92 panels were installed.

The committee discussed who would be on the panels. The idea of ​​only state champions was considered, but the committee felt it was equally important to celebrate athletes who have seen character growth or personal accomplishments. To go along with the district’s mission to do “Champions in Life,” Nielsen said the group decided to just go with the best images for the panels.

Detroit Lakes High School’s Lakeshirts Fieldhouse now offers acoustic panels for each of the 29 sports offered in the school district. For comparison, Activities Director Rob Nielsen noted that large districts, like Eden Prairie, offer 31 sports.

Barbie Porter/Detroit Lakes Tribune

“We took the photos to the artist and he figured out how to put them together,” Nielsen said. “Some of the older images look grainy, but it makes them look artistic with the way they’ve been put together.”

A police officer, who happened to be visiting the school, saw the signs and added: “Boy, this is going to dress it up (the pavilion)”.

The sound panels will also serve to reduce noise in the gym, which offers bowl seating with a basketball court at center stage. There is also a balcony with a track or standing space, and this is on the upper level where the panels have been installed.

Nielsen may get goosebumps again when the district mural project comes to fruition. For about a year, the school collected photographs of Laker alumni, and with approximately 1,500 photographs submitted, a mosaic mural was created.

PhotoMosaic (2).jpg

Detroit Lakes High School alumni have been invited to submit photographs for a mosaic to be installed at Lakeshirts Fieldhouse.

Barbie Porter/Detroit Lakes Tribune

“It has pictures of people, their families, what they’re doing now, and in those pictures you can see a sailboat and our motto ‘Champions in Life,'” Nielsen said.

The vinyl mosaic mural will measure 8 feet by 6 feet and will also be installed on the upper floor of the country house. Nielsen explained that once installed, it will appear as if it was created directly on the cement block wall.

CardioSpace.jpg

Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Adam Thielen has purchased brand new equipment for Detroit Lakes High School’s new weight room.

Barbie Porter/Detroit Lakes Tribune

If that wasn’t enough to celebrate at Laker Country, the school also applauds the generosity of a professional football player – Adam Thielen. Thielen, a 2008 Detroit Lakes High graduate, approached the school district and asked to buy all new equipment for his weight room, Nielsen said. At the time, the school hoped voters would approve the major renovation projects and asked the Minnesota Viking if the offer had an expiration date. Nielsen said Thielen was also generous with his time, allowing the school to find the right time to accept the gift.

ATweights.jpg

A student walks through the expanded weight room with new equipment. Adam Thielen, a 2008 Detroit Lakes High School graduate who plays for the Minnesota Vikings, asked the school district if they could buy all the new equipment for the weight room and graciously waited for the renovation and renovation projects. addition are complete.

Barbie Porter/Detroit Lakes Tribune

Nielsen said the new weight room was previously a half-court-sized gym space. New windows were added to the room and the state-of-the-art equipment offered was brought in.

Compared to the old weight room, the new one is about “three or four times” larger, Nielsen said. He added that the larger space allowed sports teams to use the equipment at the same time. Whereas before, there were times when teams skipped weight day, he said.

“Now we can have 60 or 70 kids at a time, all training,” he said. “Before, if we were 30, it was a tight fit.”

Equipment is in place and weight training classes are being held in the space, along with team workouts, but the mottos still need to be added to the walls along with some acoustic panels.

The former weight room has been transformed into a dance studio and a space where aerobics and yoga classes can be held. Nielsen said he was happy to give the school dance team a home.

While seeing projects that exemplify Laker Pride can cause goosebumps on Nielsen’s arms, he explained that most of the bumps belong to the people and companies that are part of Laker Pride — from Thielen providing the next generation of athletes at Lakeshirts building an ‘amazing gym’ to those who donated photos to be part of a school pride project.

“People are stepping into this community,” he said. “It’s teamwork. It’s always great to step back and look at what we’ve done together.

DanceStudio.jpg

The former weight room has been transformed into a dance studio which is also used for gym classes.

Barbie Porter/Detroit Lakes Tribune

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Griggsville-Perry District Gets $13,000 Grant to Fund New College and Career Capstone Prerequisite https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/griggsville-perry-district-gets-13000-grant-to-fund-new-college-and-career-capstone-prerequisite/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 01:10:00 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/griggsville-perry-district-gets-13000-grant-to-fund-new-college-and-career-capstone-prerequisite/ GRIGGSVILLE, Ill. (WGEM) – A Pike County school district has a new curriculum designed to help better prepare students for life after high school. The Griggsville-Perry School District has an all-new college and career education interest area program for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. All 95 students are automatically enrolled and must come in once […]]]>

GRIGGSVILLE, Ill. (WGEM) – A Pike County school district has a new curriculum designed to help better prepare students for life after high school.

The Griggsville-Perry School District has an all-new college and career education interest area program for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

All 95 students are automatically enrolled and must come in once a month to develop an individual success plan for them. The course includes workshops such as resume writing, mock interviews, personality tests, job applications, and more.

“Each grade level has their own activity that they will complete,” said program director Allison Dokey. “And we are bringing in community members and professionals to help them better prepare. Thus, the students can network and it also involves the community.

Dokey said each class can take a special field trip to a college campus. Freshmen were able to tour the John Wood Community College campus in Quincy last week. Sophomores will head to Illinois State University next week.

Dokey, who is also the school’s counselor, applied for and received the $13,000 grant through the Tracy Family Foundation for special trips.

Sophomore Mariska Sherman was filling out a standard job application Wednesday afternoon under the direction of John Wood Community College leaders and Pike County Economic Development Corporation executive director Brenda Midendorf.

“It’s going really well,” Sherman said. “I learned new skills. Our first cornerstone, we made a definition of success where we wrote a paragraph of what our definition of success is, whether personal or professional. [The program] also helped me gain confidence like talking to adults in a professional way. »

Junior Jack Shoemaker said in his capstone that he brought in local professionals to polish his resume.

“We started by creating a resume,” Shoemaker said. “And sort of developing those qualities that you need in your future life that you don’t really get in a classroom.”

Shoemaker and Junior Nathalie Irvin said they are looking forward to their visit to Illinois State University next week.

“[After the JWCC visit last week] a student got on the bus after the field trip and said, “I think I’m going to college now,” Dokey said.

Dokey said the program helps students identify their individual needs.

“I’m a firm believer that not everyone is a good candidate for a four-year college,” Dokey said. “We want to expose them to all avenues, whether it’s visiting college, trade schools or work facilities. It is also to help them prepare better, so that students can network.

Dokey said that at the end of the program, seniors have what’s called a “reverse job fair” where they set up vendors and showcase their portfolios to local professionals.

She said she hopes this pilot program will continue after this school year.

Below is the program for each level:

PART I – Field Trips: Each grade level will have the opportunity to take a field trip to a college campus, trade school/program, and major employer in the area. The purpose of field trips is to expose students to the opportunities available to them. Many students never get the chance to see much outside of Pike County, so we think it’s very beneficial to take students on this trip. Our first field trip was last week. We took the freshmen to Quincy to tour John Wood Community College’s main campus, the Quincy Workforce Center (where their trades programs are located), and toured the ADM Research Farm.

PART II – College/Professional Activities by Grade Level: On the first Wednesday of each month, students participate in activities that will better prepare them for life after high school. Community members, alumni and local business people participate in the activities. This not only allows the community to get involved in school activities, but also allows our students to network and see what local employers expect of their employees.

9th grade

  • Create a personal “definition of success”
  • Self evaluation
  • Career Search Paper
  • Personality Type Inventory
  • College/Career Panel

10th year

  • Resume workshop
  • Pre-work videos/activities
  • Job application workshop
  • College/Career Panel

11th grade

  • Career Development Chart
  • Financial analysis
  • Interview a professional
  • College/Career Panel

12th grade

  • Mock interview
  • College/Career Panel
  • Job shadowing experience
  • Reverse Job Fair

Copyright 2022 WGEM. All rights reserved.

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Historic site hosts programs on life in early Indiana https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/historic-site-hosts-programs-on-life-in-early-indiana/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 11:29:12 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/historic-site-hosts-programs-on-life-in-early-indiana/ FOUNTAIN CITY, Ind. – Five upcoming programs at the Levi and Catharine Coffin State Historic Site will explore life in an old Indiana home, the history and science of food preservation, and the connection between abolition and the pie the pumpkin. Children can learn what life was like in 1839 with “Life in an Early […]]]>

FOUNTAIN CITY, Ind. – Five upcoming programs at the Levi and Catharine Coffin State Historic Site will explore life in an old Indiana home, the history and science of food preservation, and the connection between abolition and the pie the pumpkin.

Children can learn what life was like in 1839 with “Life in an Early Indiana” programs Nov. 5 and Dec. 3, according to a news release. Programs run from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and cost $3 per person, with a 25% discount for members.

The children will visit the Coffin house and discover the tasks assigned to 1839 children, how the school operated and what the children did for fun.

Registration is mandatory the day before the program.

A virtual program, “Abolition and Pumpkin Pie,” will be from 7-8:30 p.m. on November 16. The cost is $5 per person, with a 25% discount for members.

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Spirits Roam These Halls – Haunted Blennerhassett Captures Local Ghost Stories https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/spirits-roam-these-halls-haunted-blennerhassett-captures-local-ghost-stories/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 00:48:00 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/spirits-roam-these-halls-haunted-blennerhassett-captures-local-ghost-stories/ PARKERSBURG, WV (WTAP) — The Blennerhassett Hotel is 133 years old and it has ghost stories to prove it. They are behind the creation of the Haunted Blennerhassett program. Haunted Blennerhassett founder Adra Johnson said of the hotel, “We were actually named ‘most haunted in West Virginia’ by Thrillest this year, which is super exciting…number […]]]>

PARKERSBURG, WV (WTAP) — The Blennerhassett Hotel is 133 years old and it has ghost stories to prove it. They are behind the creation of the Haunted Blennerhassett program.

Haunted Blennerhassett founder Adra Johnson said of the hotel, “We were actually named ‘most haunted in West Virginia’ by Thrillest this year, which is super exciting…number six in Most Haunted Hotel in North America by Country Living.”

Inspired by her own paranormal experiences at the hotel, Johnson founded the Haunted Blennerhassett program, starting it this year.

One of the activities he offers is ghost tours.

“So my monthly visit lasts an hour. If I had to go into every little thing that happened in every place, it would be at least three or four hours,” Johnson said.

Visits are not just stories. During the second half, participants have the opportunity to use ghost hunting equipment.

“What interests me is that we always catch something. We always do, whereas Ghost Hunters shows, they sometimes film for days at a time and sometimes get nothing…” Johnson said.

She saw him turn skeptics into believers.

“The most satisfying thing for me is when someone is a little skeptical or not in the first half of the actual tour and then we start the gear up and you can just see their faces change. You can see it light up when they start having these interactions,” Johnson said.

Haunted Blennerhassett isn’t just tours. The fourth floor will be locked down for a paranormal investigation in March. Johnson said it would be led by professional paranormal investigators.

During that same month, the hotel will host the Appalachian ParaCon.

Tickets for ParaCon and the March Survey will go on sale beginning Halloween. Call the hotel to order.

If you are interested in tour tickets, call the hotel at 304-422-3131. It costs $20 and is for ages 16 and up.

You also have the option of booking an overnight stay with your ghost package.

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Local veterans pass on their knowledge to JROTC students https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/local-veterans-pass-on-their-knowledge-to-jrotc-students/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 23:43:32 +0000 https://caribbeancowboyrvresort.com/local-veterans-pass-on-their-knowledge-to-jrotc-students/ LEWISBURG, WV (WVNS) – A local veteran is paving the way for the next generation. Sergeant Lefty Smith has learned a lifetime of lessons during his 24 years of military service. But now he spends his days passing those lessons on to the next generation. Sergeant Smith, along with retired Command Star Major Jerry Long […]]]>

LEWISBURG, WV (WVNS) – A local veteran is paving the way for the next generation.

Sergeant Lefty Smith has learned a lifetime of lessons during his 24 years of military service. But now he spends his days passing those lessons on to the next generation.

Sergeant Smith, along with retired Command Star Major Jerry Long and retired Major Darel Pickenpaugh, run the award-winning JROTC program at Greenbrier East High School.

Smith said he tries to instill in his students leadership skills, discipline and the importance of serving the community.

“It’s important for me to get involved in the community. The younger we are and the more children we can involve in activities, the fewer bad choices we will have to make,” Smith told 59News.

With over 300 children enrolled, Greenbrier East is one of the largest JROTC programs in the entire state. They are also one of the most successful.

The Rifleman team has won four consecutive West Virginia State Championships. They also have a Drill competition team and a Raider obstacle course team.

Students considering joining the military after high school say they learn a lot from Sergeant Smith’s leadership style.

“You end up learning that you’re going to get yelled at no matter what,” joked Senior Isaac Vance, who plans to enlist after graduation. “If you do good or bad, you’re going to get yelled at. So you’ll get used to it.

But Sergeant Smith doesn’t just connect with students who are considering enlisting. It also welcomes students without any military plan in its JROTC courses.

He always passes on the lessons he learned in service, to try to make each of his students a better member of the community.

“You learn a lot of leadership skills, a lot of social skills, you learn to be a good worker and to focus on what you want to do,” senior Thomas Mullins said.

Mullins says that while he has no plans to enlist, the skills Sergeant Smith taught him will come in handy when he’s CEO.

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