Bluff Top Park upgrades complete in Huntington Beach

Bluff Top Park is one of Huntington Beach’s largest parks, with nearly 20 acres of land adjacent to the Pacific Coast Highway between 9th and Seapoint streets.

Some visit the park to explore it on foot or by bike, others simply to enjoy the view. Everyone can benefit from the $3.7 million in improvements the City has made there in recent months.

City officials held a groundbreaking ceremony Monday morning for the latest improvements to the park, including the widening of the bike path, a new sidewalk and landscaping improvements.

“We’ve been trying to do this for so long,” Mayor Barbara Delgleize said. “I’m just grateful that you can all be here this morning to enjoy this… This park is well known for its diverse recreational opportunities, offering everything from multi-use trails to beach access points and viewing areas. I have always been a big proponent of reinvesting in our parks and recreation areas. Recreational areas such as Bluff Top Park are the heart of the community and must-have areas that can benefit everyone.

Wooden lodge-style fencing is part of the new upgrades to Bluff Top Park in Huntington Beach.

(Don Leach / personal photographer)

The city used $2 million budgeted through the Park Development Impact Fund, as well as $1.7 million in state funding allocated by Deputy Cottie Petrie-Norris (D-Irvine) , for upgrades.

The work took place in two phases. The first phase involved installing wooden fencing on flag posts along a nearly two-mile stretch of the cliff tops, replacing the old rusting metal railings.

Then, in December, the city council accepted a bid from Green Giant Landscape for the Bluff Top Park Trail Improvement Project.

Huntington Beach Director of Public Works Sean Crumby said the second phase of improvements, begun in March and recently completed, included widening the bike path to 18 feet.

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Orange Coast District State Park Superintendent. Kevin Pearsall makes comments, as Mayor Barbara Delgleize looks on, during Monday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony.

(Don Leach / personal photographer)

“It gave us enough space to separate faster-moving traffic from foot traffic,” he said.

Additionally, a sidewalk was installed, making the space ADA compliant and making it easier to load and unload beach gear. Previously, the grassy area extended to the sidewalk.

Landscaping upgrades also played into the project.

Superintendent of California State Parks. Kevin Pearsall, who spoke at Monday’s ceremony, said there are 279 state parks.

“In Huntington, state parks serve a large recreational purpose,” he said. “This remodeling or improvement…is fantastic. Even the fence alone is long overdue and such an aesthetic improvement. The upgrades to the bike path, the multi-use trail, it brings such a vital opportunity to really want to be outdoors and recreate. Post-COVID, the more outdoors we can have, the better.

A crowd attends the Huntington Beach City Dedication Ceremony at Bluff Top Park on Monday.

A crowd attends the Huntington Beach City Dedication Ceremony at Bluff Top Park on Monday.

(Don Leach / personal photographer)

“Every time I’ve been past it in the last four months it just looks better and better. It’s kind of like a paint job. Once it’s done, you’re like, ‘Wow, that’s fantastic, it was worth the wait.’ »

Crumby said the improvements were crucial for the city, which has its beach-loving residents but also attracts more than 11 million tourists each year, for big events including the recent US Open of Surfing.

“It’s one of the most critical parts of our city, our beach,” he said. “Our tourism is centered around that.”

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